Cursed>>Woe J. Reaper>>FURZE - NORWAY

Trident Autocrat - 2000 - Apocalyptic Empire Records
Necromanzee Cogent - 2003 - Apocalyptic Empire Records
UTD - 2007 - Candlelight
Reaper Subconscious Guide - 2010 - Agonia


  
 
Members

S= Exitium>>WOE J. REAPER>>Exitium
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B=
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History

Furze is the Trondheim, Norway black metal band of one Woe J. Reaper (neé Smith?). The project was assembled in 1996 and demos with names like Necromanzee, Zaredoo and Trident Black Metal Feast followed. The man issued an EP called First Feast For Freedom in 2000 before venturing into the full-length arena. A self-titled EP in 2004 preceded the band’s signing with Candlelight Records, which, aside from a 2007 album, also reissued the band’s first two album. Drummer Frost (a.k.a. Kjetil Haraldstad) could be heard on two songs of the UTD album. The album’s vinyl version included a poster of Jesus and Mohammed in S&M fornication pose. Reaper Subconscious Guide appeared in late 2010, by which time the band was called The Furze on disc.

Reviews

FURZE - UTD - CANDLELIGHT  
Furze’s third album UTD is actually subtitled Beneath The Odd-Edge Sounds To The Twilight Contract Of The Black Fascist/The Wealth Of The Penetration In The Abstract Paradigmas Of Satan. If that title (essay?) does not convince the reader that the band’s pro-antagonist is riddled with drugs of the highest psychedelic effect, then nothing will. On the musical, and indeed image, front Furze is inspired by Darkthrone and hence all black (and white) all the time. The production values mimic the sounds of a sick frog’s bowel movements with added distortion. The special vocal effects on Demonic Order In The Eternal Fascist’s Hall and Deep In The Pot Of Fresh Antipodal Weave are something else as are the shrieks and gasps on Beneath The Wings Of The Black Vomit Above. Incidentally, readers have my promise to avoid writing out any other song titles in the interest of keeping this review from taking up more bandwidth than the site’s annual allowance!
Furze is not quite impressive like Darkthrone or powerful and menacing like Mayhem. The band and album - which incidentally is reportedly two conjoined releases - are nowhere near as blatantly rubbish as Ensepulchred either. There is something fascinating about a man who assembles such anti-commercial offering and pursues it without hesitation, although in this case it has sadly left out the notion of music, sound and most direly heaviness. - Ali “The Metallian”

FURZE - REAPER SUBCONSCIOUS GUIDE - AGONIA  
A new Furze album is upon us and lo and behold, the man band is making a pale imitation of Saint Vitus from start to finish. The dedication to the “’70-’75 era of Black Sabbath” is telling of course, as is the typical over-estimation of Black Sabbath. The band is, of course, truly legendary, yet listen to the 1970 debut and hear led Zeppelin 1 or Blue Cheer or a dozen bands of the era done just a little heavier and just a little more sinister. People who lived through the era were not finding Black Sabbath revolutionary; rather it was evolutionary. Still, bands like Furze (and Saint Vitus) give us a different impression.
The album is divided into two 'pages' that differ little in content. It is Sabbathy, it is drone and it is pretty underground. Unfortunately, it is also on the ground too, as in a drunkard who has stumbled and cannot get up. That’s how the vocals and erratic vocals come across. Then there are the tinkering and the bells, which surely would be soothing to an infant in a crib! There is a lot of time for them as the songs run well above average in duration.
This is drug-addled and pretty much nonsense and barely has novelty value. - Ali “The Metallian”




Interviews


Furze