Terry Knight & The Pack>>Grand Funk Railroad>>Grand Funk>>GRAND FUNK RAILROAD>>Grand Funk - USA

On Time - 1970 - Capitol
Grand Funk - 1970 - Capitol
Closer To Home - 1970 - Capitol
Live - 1971 - Capitol
Survival - 1971 - Capitol
E Pluribus Funk - 1972 - Capitol
Phoenix - 1973 - Capitol
We're An American Band - 1973 - Capitol
Shinin' On - 1974 - Capitol
All The Girls Of The World Beware!!! - 1974 - Capitol
Caught In The Act - 1975 - Capitol
Born To Die - 1976 - Capitol
Good Singin' Good Playin' - 1976 - Capitol
Grand Funk Lives - 1981 - Full Moon
What's Funk? - 1983 - Full Moon
Bosnia - 1997 - Capitol
Live: The 1971 Tour - 2002 - Capitol


  
 
Members

S= Solo>>Mark Farner>>Solo, N’r,G
G= Solo>>Mark Farner>>Solo, N’r,G
B= Mel Schacher - Dennis Bellinger
D= Jazz Masters, Flint, Bob Seger>>DON BREWER>>Flint, Bob Seger
K= Craig Frost>>Flint, Bob Seger’s Silver Bullet Band



History

This band was formed in the industrial town of Flint, Michigan and was initially the idea of one Terry Knight (born Richard Knapp) who was a famous Windsor, Canada DJ with singing ambitions on CKLW radio. The band’s name was inspired by a Michigan railroad called Grand Trunk Western Railroad. The band changed its monicker to Grand Funk Railroad following the addition of singer Mark Farner who was also in Terry Knight & The Pack - Knight becoming the act's manager - and had its breakthrough at the 1969 Atlanta Pop Festival. Terry Knight & The Pack had had a hit single called I (Who Have Nothing), which was a cover of Ben E. King’s hit. As legend had it, the band begged its way onto the roster of the 1969 festival having waived its usual fee. They then proceeded to deliberately turn up the volume to white noise levels immediately making the promoters regret their decision. The band played four more Southern festivals that year. The crowd, however, loved it! In 1973 they shortened the monicker - possibly consequent to the firing of manager Knight - to Grand Funk and soon added a keyboardist just in time for We're An American Band. The band was one of the biggest American draws at this point.

Grand Funk Railroad was initially the subject of much bad press, but always managed to capitalize on the fact. The group was boycotting the press for the longest time as well. However, when in May of 1971 it would finally announce a press conference it would taste its own medicine when members of the press would boycott the band. Regardless, Knight’s unorthodox method of promoting the band included billboards, aeroplanes and buses.

Regardless, On Time topped the American album charts. The next three albums would be similar successes.

Following the release of All The Girls Of The World Beware! it was back to Railroad; and again off the train when the band reformed in 1981 having split once in 1977. How appropriate that the cover of Born To Die had depicted coffins. 1976’s Good Singin' Good Playin' was produced by Frank Zappa, but the band’s popularity had certainly waned by then.

The band had gone from success to success peaking with the 1973 album and single, We're An American Band. Grand Funk epitomized the ethic of the '70s seemingly always on the road and releasing an album once or twice a year.

The reformed band of 1980 was a trio and appeared on the Heavy Metal soundtrack. The group disbanded three years later. The line-up featured new bassist Dennis Bellinger. The band made yet another appearance in 1997 and recorded a benefit CD called Bosnia. A successful tour accompanied the album. Farner left again amidst acrimony. The band was still active with the turn of the century. The group featured .38 Special singer Max Carl and former Kiss guitarist Bruce Kulick and continued to tour.

Farner became a gospel singer. He had a solo career beginning mid ’70s. Terry Knight was murdered in Texas on November 1, 2004 by the boyfriend of his daughter.

Reviews




Interviews


Grand Funk Railroad