MOB RULES - GERMANY

Savage Land – 1999 – LMP
Temple Of Two Sons – 2000 – LMP
Hallowed Be Thy Name – 2002 – SPV
Among The Gods – 2002 – SPV
Signs Of The Time – Live – 2005 – SPV
Ethnolution A.D. – 2006 - SPV
Radical Peace – 2009 - AFM
Cannibal Nation – 2012 - AFM
Tales From Beyond – 2016 - AFM


  
 
Members

S= KLAUS DIRKS
G= Oliver Fulhage – Van Blanc>>MATTHIAS MINEUR – Murder One>>SVEN LÜDKE
B= Van Blanc>>Thorsten Plorin - MARKUS BRINKMAN
D= Arved Mannott - Savallion Dawn>>NIKOLAS FRITZ>>Savallion Dawn
K= Sascha Onnen>>Love.Might.Kill - Experience X>>JAN CHRISTIAN HALFBRODT>>Experience X



History

Mob Rules was formed in the northern German port city of Wilhelmshaven in 1994 by guitarist Matthias Mineur and bassist Thorsten Plorin both formerly of Van Blanc. The 1996 demo Savage Land Pt. 1 is remarkable in that it offers a prequel to a title and story to come, but also for its cover depicting a photograph rather than the fantasy artwork the band’s upcoming album would portray. The band’s line-up carries on to a contract with Limb Music and the Savage Land debut of 1999. The band toured Germany with Ivory Tower and played at the Wacken Festival in 2000. Mob Rules is a quintet at this point and does not feature a keyboardist.

After two albums the band switches to Steamhammer/SPV and also recruits a full-time keyboardist, Sascha Onnen. In 2002, the band not only returned to Wacken, but also opened for Savatage. The band’s live album, Signs Of The Time – Live, was released in 2005. There was also a DVD. Lüdke now replaces Fulhage. In May of 2007 Mob Rules played its first show outside Europe at the Bay Area Festival in San Francisco, California USA. Fritz replaced founding member Mannott on drums.

The Germans switch over to another German label, this time AFM Records, and issue Radical Peace in 2009. The album was recorded at Bazement Studio with engineer Markus Teske. A single, called Astral Hand, preceded the CD. Jan Christian Halfbrodt was the band’s new keyboard player beginning 2010. Onnen ostensibly wanted more time with his family. Cannibal Nation contained a song about Jean-Bedel Bokassa, the African human butcher.

While the band’s monicker obviously is borrowed from Black Sabbath’s 1981 album featuring Ronnie James Dio, the group’s third album is also likely inspired by the Iron Maiden song featured on the Number Of The Beast album. Mineur notes that he chose the band name after seeing George Lynch of Lynch Mob wear a cap proclaimig “Lynch Mob Rules.” Matthias Mineur is a professional writer who has written for Metal Hammer. Mob Rules released an album called Tales From Beyond on March 18th through Steamhammer. Mob Rules opened for Axel Rudi Pell on tour in April.

Reviews

MOB RULES - TEMPLE OF TWO SUNS - LMP
It's very cool how every LMP release comes with a fabulously metallic cover art. Germany's Mob Rules being no exception, new album Temple of Two Suns comes with a cover depicting the lyrical concept held within. Musically, the band mix the pomp rock of Magnum with the air and circumstance of Savatage and additionally throw in some clearly metallic power into the fray. The vocalist is in command and the musicians are certainly not far behind. There is nothing shockingly new or original about Mob Rules ( just look at the band moniker!), but that's the point: the band knows its likes and dislikes and clearly stays within its niche. Good for them! - Ali "The Metallian"

MOB RULES - ETHNOLUTION AD - SPV  
The Germans continue tackling politics and world affairs with Ethnolution AD, titles like Unholy Wars and Fuel To The Fire, two parts of the six part opening song and title track, attest to that. Musically the sextet combine acoustic elements, melodic riffs and vocals and arrangements very reminiscent of '80s AOR. Mob Rules does however delve into more metal realms, particularly in Fuel To the Fire and The Last Farewell but the presence of clean pianos segments take the band further and further away from being considered truly heavy metal. Often one can peek a Pretty Maids influence or two but that may just be the general direction and style of the Germans. Coming from Germany it is no surprise that the musicianship and production is superior here and as such the market for Mob Rules is definitely a big one in their home and many a European country. - Anna Tergel




Interviews


Mob Rules