Uninterred>>NAGLFAR - SWEDEN

Vittra – 1995 – Wrong Again
Diabolical – 1998 – WAR
Sheol – 2003 – New Haven/Century Media
Pariah – 2005 – Century Media
Harvest – 2007 – Century Media
Téras – 2012 - Century Media


  
 
Members

S= Thyrfing, Dead Silent, Slumber, Ancient Wisdom>>Jens Ryden>> Thyrfing, Dead Silent, Slumber, Ancient Wisdom, Profundi – Bloodline, Setherial, Necrophobic>>KRISTOFFER OLIVIUS>>Bloodline, Necrophobic
G= Ancient, Ancient Wisdom, Midvinter, Melek Taus, Pain>>ANDREAS NILSSON>>Ancient Wisdom, Midvinter, Melek Taus, Pain – Hanayoth>>Morgan Hansson>>Hanayoth – Ancient, Ancient Wisdom, Vintersorg, Eudaimony, Hanayath, Bewitched, Throne Of Ahaz>>MARCUS NORMAN>>Ancient Wisdom, Vintersorg, Eudaimony, Bewitched, Havayoth
B= Setherial, Bewitched, Midvinter>>Kristoffer Olivius>> Havayoth, Setherial, Bewitched, Midvinter – Auberon, Bone Gnawer, Hate Ammo>>Peter Morgan Lie>>Auberon, Bone Gnawer, Hate Ammo
D= Mishrak, Embracing, Shadows>>Mattias Holmgren>>Azure, Embracing, Nocturnal Rites, Supreme Majesty, Tired Tree, Darkside Cowboys – Engraved>>Mattias Grahn



History

Formed in 1992 in Umeå, Sweden as Uninterred with Jens Rydén on both vocals and guitars, the death metal band issued a 1994 demo called Stellae Trajectio, which featured three proper songs. The name Naglfar was picked in 1993 despite the existence of a Norwegian band with the same name. Fredrik of Disorge was asked to leave in January of 1994 and replaced by Nilsson. Ulf Andersson of Nocturnal Rites left the drum position in 1994. The band issued another demo, called Urkraft, in early 1995. The band also pressed band T-shirts in January of 1995 in order to promote itself further. Promo ’95 featured tracks that would end up on the band’s debut album of that year and lead to a deal with Wrong Again Music for two albums, which was the label of Per of Deranged. Vittra was recorded at Abyss Studio. Oddly, the band issued a demo in 1996 called Maiden Slaughter before issuing the 1998 EP When Autumn Storms Come and the second record. Grahn and the band had met in a pub and the group finally had a permanent drummer. Hansson was asked to leave in 2000 and even called “mad” by his former band-mates. By 2002 the band had moved on to Century Media – despite having earlier signed to New Haven in 2000 - and had an EP called Ex Inferis. The group already had the opportunity to tour with Deicide. The studio used was actually called Ballerina. Ryden left in 2005 and Olivius abandoned the bass for vocals with the band recruiting Peter Morgan Lie back into the group. This man drummed for the band between 1995 and 1997 although the early demos were recorded with a drum machine. The group played Wacken in 2005 and had also toured with Finntroll and Amoral. The band toured Japan in 2007 with Satyricon and USA with Dark Funeral. The band’s Téras album was out in March of 2012 through Century Media. Drums-for-hire Dirk Verbeuren played on the album. Prior to the release the label would release a 7” EP called An Extension Of His Arm And Will, which was limited to 500 hand-numbered copies. Bassist Alexander "Impaler" Friberg (Necrophobic) and drummer Efraim Juntunen (Persuader and Guillotine) joined Naglfar’s touring line-up. The band was again in Japan in 2012. As of 2011 the band was a trio of Olivius, Nilsson and Norman. The former man announced that due to a ruptured eardrum doctor had forbade him from temporarily playing music. Shows were cancelled. Necrophobic singer und bassist Tobias Sidegard was imprisoned in 2013 and the band employed singer Kristoffer Olivius instead for live performances. The band played at Wacken in 2013, where due to the airlines misplacing the band’s equipment, gear had to be borrowed from Tristania and Benighted, and announced work on a new album as of 2014. Swedish shows for autumn of 2013 and Germany’s Fimbul Festival, however, were cancelled. The group was playing shows in countries like Germany and Norway.

According to Norse mythology naglfar is a ship made from the nails of the dead. It will sail during the Ragnarök.

Reviews

NAGLFAR - EX INFERIS - WAR/CENTURY MEDIA
Naglfar is brilliant. Having enjoyed the band's demo and previous two albums, it is easy to vouch for the durability of the genuine death metal that Naglfar has consistently composed and delivered. The band is clearly Dissection-inspired, but does incorporate much that one can only hear on a Naglfar recording. Further the Swedes write involved lyrics, multi-layer fast and heavy songs and vocalist Jens Ryden sings his guts out. The EP features two new tracks, two tracks 'stolen' from the band's When Autumn Storms Come 7' and a Massacre cover. - Ali "The Metallian"

NAGLFAR - SHEOL - NEW HAWEN/CENTURY MEDIA
This writer has been a Naglfar fan since their Promo '95 demo. Soon after the band's debut entitled Vittra solidified the act's reputation as one of the best death metal bands anywhere. Sheol (Hebrew for 'hell') is the band's long-awaited third full-length and maintains the band amazing grasp of all things musically infernal. Sheol might not be as immediate and catchy as Vittra, but nevertheless is another tight and powerful exercise in harmonic and mayhemic death-barrage. Naglfar has never hidden its Dissection influences and those are as present today as they were on days one. The dynamic death metal of Naglfar owes a lot to Dissection and becomes even more critical given the originator's absence. The songs are melodious, fast and heavy; the vocals rain from hell and the lyrics spew venom upon mankind unrelentingly. Naglfar is best when it cranks up the frenzied guitars, as on Unleash Hell (also the title of a song on the current Vital Remains album) or Force Of Pandemonium, and should consider incorporating more lead work into the pandemonium. Having said that, Sheol is one hell (there is that word again) of an album and practically a must for fans of Dissection, Dawn or Naglfar's earlier work. - Ali "The Metallian"

NAGLFAR - PARIAH - CENTURY MEDIA
An intro called Proclamation declares that ”˜Your flesh is now ours’ and provides a fitting start to Pariah. The songs that follow are close to Dissection musically while the production reminds one of the early Marduk sound. The only blemishes are the Cradle Of Filth sounding effects and breaks in this otherwise mostly straightforward black metal release. The most obvious of the aforementioned flaws is the start of None Shall Be Spared and even if one accepts that some effects add something to a song it takes Naglfar dangerously close to sampling Cradle Of Filth’s Her Ghost In The Fog.
With Jens Ryden gone and Kristoffer Olivius providing aggressive but clean vocals and with cries of 'I despise you' and titles like Spoken Words Of Venom this album is a scornful release filled with moments that make for excellent hate anthems. - Anna Tergel

NAGLFAR - HARVEST - CENTURY MEDIA  
It has become increasingly rare to find albums that really stick out amidst the sea of albums overflowing in the overworked metal scene. Harvest is that rare masterpiece that can become the jewel of any death metal fanatic’s CD player. Naglfar is reaping the seeds sown by the very best of the sub-genre which includes the Swedes’ own previous work. It is difficult not getting the feeling that Harvest may represent the zenith of the band’s career.
Song after blackened song on the band’s nine-track album is brimming with well-produced and powerful blasts of death metal, which while often fiercely fast, has been consecrated with copious layering, multi-tracked guitars and venomous vocals vomiting vengeance. Into The Black and Breathe Through Me give a cursory nod to late Satyricon, with the latter kicking in with the mega-speeds. The Darkest Road highlights Kristoffer Olivius’ penchant for being both extreme and comprehensible. The vocals, should one listen for it, have the knack for being bestial even if one can hear the words enunciated. Feeding Moloch, perhaps more than any other song, brings the legacy of Dissection to darkened light and incorporates a myriad of vocal styles, all extreme nonetheless. The track harkens back to Naglfar’s own Vittra album from 1995. Feeding Moloch begins with a piano piece on the face of it sounding like belonging to a silent movie before giving way to incredibly well produced melodic guitars. The pianos, incidentally, are the sole complaint one could (and should) level at Naglfar 2007. The traitorous keyboards make cameo appearances on several songs. The offence is strictly limited in measure of time and count but they do appear nonetheless. That defilement keeps Harvest from being a solid 'ninety' at Metallian Towers.
Naglfar’s Harvest is, in case it has not already been made abundantly clear, a crushing death metal album of superlatives. Every song, every jaw dropping moment of beautiful violence, is a striking example of what happens when talented vocals, metal music and the right production values come together. - Ali “The Metallian”




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Naglfar