SUIDAKRA -




  
 
Members

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History



Reviews

SUIDAKRA - SIGNS FOR THE FALLEN - CENTURY MEDIA
Boy, is this band and album a surprise. Germany's Suidakra is described as a metal band with Celtic influences which leaves one to expect the worst. Visions of Skyclad or Subway To Sally were dancing in the chambers of Metallian Towers upon laying eyes on that description.
Lo and behold, the quartet storms out of the gates with one of the tightest, most proficient and best-produced albums one will hear this year. From opener Revenant to album closer A Vision's Demise, the Germans deliver a solid and satisfying speed metal album with touches of thrash and death metal to boot. Sure, the odd acoustic or folksy interlude makes a cameo appearance on Signs For The Fallen, but the act is definitely more The Forsaken than Subway To Sally. In fact, about the only major criticism here is the undersupply of guitar solos - something the band is capable of delivering, just listen to the song A Vision's Demise. The band's singer is qualified for his role and drummer Lars has to be one of the most on-time and precise drummers this side of a drum machine. This band must rehearse seven times a week to be this together.
Suidakra is tight, powerful, heavy and melodic at the same time. It is a pity that the band is not a bigger name. For were more people exposed to this then the band would surely be a more popular on the scene. - Ali "The Metallian"

SUIDAKRA - 13 YEARS OF CELTIC WARTUNES (DVD+CD) - SPV  
If these are war tunes then Suidakra must mean they make the enemy either sick or bored. If bagpipes and fake sounding anger are not enough there is an acoustic concert in addition to the main feature, Wacken footage. The hints of death, black, or even typical German heavy metal cannot come close to compensating for the other stuff. The CD is a 'best of' and features 17 songs, four of them re-recorded. It is very difficult to take these Germans seriously. - Anna Tergel

SUIDAKRA - CROGACHT - SPV  
In lieu of going on and on about the two-facedness of a band calling its style Pagan/Celtic Metal or how this band hails from Germany (hello French band Blut Aus Nord and Roman Viking metal!) the following quotations from the album’s biography should do the job for us. The band is “combining fast melodic death metal, Irish folk music”... How about the usage of “bagpipes, banjo, tin whistles” or “sixteen member choir and epic orchestral arrangements”? The folk strums and the female singer crooning exclusively on one track, called Feats of War, do not require any more explanation.
The album’s simple and symbolic cover artwork is rather all right however. - Anna Tergel




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Suidakra