SYMPHONY OF SYMBOLS - HUNGARY




  
 
Members

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History



Reviews

SYMPHONY OF SYMBOLS – HISTORIOCRITICISM – METAL SCRAP  
That this Hungary-based death/black metal band is extreme, technical and its drummer likes to mince his kits and the listeners’ eardrums like that country’s Prime Minister Viktor Mihály Orbán minces the truth and reality is indisputable. Having said that, the group and its second album, which is a concept about civilizations, suffer from a bad sound and the general inability of the band’s style not holding a beat for more than a few seconds. That latter statement could be taken absolutely positively for many however. The purpose of metal is not to be easily digestible or commercial. The potential buyer should be aware of the fact nevertheless.
The band is clearly inspired by Morbid Angel’s technical work. Unfortunately, the sound though harkens back to Abominations Of Desolation. The style is intense, the drummer as mentioned grinds the enemy and one also, and unfortunately, hears the occasional whispered vocals and synthesizers a la Morbid Angel on a song like Giant Signs. Not sure if a track like In The Serve Of Evil is intentionally so entitled or signals an opportunity for the band to improve its English but it is one of several instances where the group injects interludes into its chaos. The album is an hour long though so the presence of these minute-long intermissions does not take away from the disc’s value. With that said, one could do without them. The First Nation, The Last Survivor hints at Atheist, Beyond Earth is a superb cut full of speed and Verity In The Legends seems like a boring waste of space before one of the band’s many time changes appears, things look up and even a scarce solo impresses.
SOS loves its nuclear drums and its reverb. It also loves Morbid Angel. It hates commercialism or mainstream appeal. For my money the band needs to up its songwriting ante and clearly ascend above the muddy plain in which its sound resides. – Ali “The Metallian”




Interviews


Symphony Of Symbols