TWIN OBSCENITY -




  
 
Members

S=
G=
B=
D=



History



Reviews

TWIN OBSCENITY - WHERE THE LIGHT TOUCHES NONE - HEAD NOT FOUND
Beginning with an appropriately dark cover and packaging, a good sound and on to the opening moments of album opener Dark Millenium's End (sic), Norway's Twin Obscenity presents an aural image of a metal band of many potentials. With a sound half way between Morbid Angel and more recent Immortal the trio of Atle (vocals, guitars and keyboards) Jo-Arild (bass) and Knut (drums) showcase a band that is mature beyond the release of one album. Enriched by well thought-out arrangements, multi-layered guitar tracks, entertaining rhythm changes and a challenging myriad of six string sounds, TO makes a good heavy metal band. Unfortunately though, when the fountain surges high it tends to fall back to earth with a vengeance. That force of gravity this time is provided by senseless keyboards and operatic moments heard on disappointing tracks like Like The Death Of A Sorceress and track six, The Infernal Dance Of Prince Kaleth. Tracks such as these manage to yank the chain of success with vigor, bring the Norwegian trio to a standstill without reaching the level of success and achievement potentially theirs. For as every metal fan knows, Morbid Angel and Immortal are names commemorated with respect. Therion, on the other hand, is nothing more than a wimped out butt of a joke. - Ali "The Metallian"

TWIN OBSCENITY - FOR BLOOD, HONOUR AND SOIL - CENTURY MEDIA
Twin Obscenity's one-year old debut Where Light Touches None released originally by Head Not Found, while not being especially note or praiseworthy, was apparently impressive enough for Century Media's rank and file to bring the band on board and ensure that the act's next album is released through the label. Regardless of merit the signing reaffirms the label's intention of basing its A&R on recruiting bands with albums already out on smaller labels as opposed to discovering newcomer or demo acts. The Norwegian trio of Atle Wiig (Vocals, guitars and keyboards), Jo-Arild Toennessen (bass) and drummer Knut Naesje continues the sound established on its debut which is a cause for disappointment at Metallian Towers. The band has a great foundation. Underground riffs combine with with a raw sound akin to Dissection to bring forth a worthy atmosphere. Very soon thereafter though, the appearance of keyboards (which often drowns the guitar) and bouts of female whining drag the whole affair to the ground by replacing what could have been a positive experience into a mundane one not worth remembering. Bands and labels have to understand the difference between metal and other genres of music. They will otherwise preside over the destruction of the scene. - Ali "The Metallian"




Interviews


Twin Obscenity